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Nutrition Guild for people living with Cancers
  

Feeling Tired 
Nausea and Vomiting
Sore Mouth, Sore , Throat
Dry Mouth, Thick Saliva
Taste changes

Feeling Tired (obtained from American Institute of Preventive Medicine)

I am so tired that I find it difficult to eat. What can I do?

Feeling tired makes shopping for food, cooking, and even eating a meal difficult. Try the following tips to get the food you need. Remember, food will help give you energy and stamina.

    Use frozen, canned or ready-to-use foods or meals

    Prepare extra servings of your favorite foods and freeze them for times when you don't feel like cooking

    Have ready-to-eat snacks to nibble on such as cheese and crackers, hard boiled eggs, canned puddings, ice creams, yogurt, granola bars, muffins, nuts, dried fruits and seed mixtures

    Eat foods that have a lot of calories

    Invites family or friends over to help you cook a meal

          Consider using community programs such as Meals on Wheels, home care services, or grocery delivery services to help with shopping or cooking meals. Ask your dietitian for more information


Nausea and Vomiting

Eating makes me feel sick and sometimes I can't keep the food I eat down. What can I do?

Nausea and vomiting can keep you from getting the nutrients and energy you need. Eat what you can and be sure to get enough fluids. You may find the following tips helpful.

    Take anti-nausea medication as prescribed by your doctor. Check with your doctor if you are having problems keeping food down

    Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of fluids daily to avoid dehydration. Sip fluids frequently between meals

    Try drinking chilled or frozen fluids. Freeze drinks in ice cube trays

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Sore Mouth, Sore , Throat

How can I cope with a sore mouth and throat?

A sore mouth and throat may be caused by radiation therapy, certain medications, chemotherapy and/or infections. Eating can be made easier by taking care of your mouth and carefully choosing the foods that you eat. The following suggestions will help you eat better.

    Make sure your doctor is aware of any mouth problems you may be experiencing. Your doctor or nurse will be able to give you tips about mouth care and mediations that will ease mouth or throat pain

    Rinse your mouth with baking soda and water mouthwash often during the day to help clean and refresh your mouth. See below for the recipe

    Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of fluids daily to avoid dehydration

    Make every bite count. Choose foods and drinks that are high in calories and protein.

    Eat and drink frequently during the day. Try eating every two hours and sipping fluids throughout the day

    Choose foods that are easy for you to chew and swallow. Start with high calorie fluids if chewing is difficult for you. Gradually introduce solid foods as you are able.

Baking Soda and Water Mouthwash

 

 

5 ml

Baking Soda

1 tsp

500 ml

Water

2 cups

Combine baking soda and water and mix well

 

 

 

Dry Mouth, Thick Saliva

I have had a dry mouth since my treatment began. How can I cope with this?

Radiation to the head and neck area can change the type and amount of saliva that your mouth produces. A dry mouth and thick saliva may become a problem. Try these suggestions:

    Rinse your mouth with baking soda and water mouthwash before meals and often during the day to help clean and refresh your mouth.See instructions below:


Baking Soda and Water Mouthwash

 

 

5 ml

Baking Soda

1 tsp

500 ml

Water

2 cups

Combine baking soda and water and mix well.

 

 

    Sip liquids frequently. Carry a water bottle filled with your favorite beverage

    Try sweet or tart drinks such as warm tea with lemon, lemonade, sweetened iced tea with lemon and soft drinks. They may help your mouth produce more saliva. Do not try this if you have a sore mouth or throat

    If you fink it difficult to use milk and milk products, try using lower fat milk products such as 1% and skim milk before cutting milk out of your diet completely. Drink water after drinking milk to rinse your mouth

    Use lots of fluids with meals to help keep foods moist and make them easier to swallow

    Use butter, margarine, sauces or gravy on dry foods

    Deep your lips moist with lip balm or chap stick (check with your nurse or radiation technologist about which ones are recommended)

Taste changes

I find that some foods taste strange. What can I do?

Many people with cancer find that certain foods taste different. Each person's taste is affected differently so you will need to find which foods appeal to you. Here are some tips to help you deal with taste changes.

    Some people find that meats have a bitter, metallic taste. Try chicken, turkey, dairy products, peanut butter, eggs, tofu, fish, seafood, legumes and seeds and nuts for other sources of protein. Try using plastic utensils if food tastes metallic.

    Rinse your mouth often with baking soda and water mouthwash. 

    Choose foods that smell and look good to you

    Tart foods may help to overcome a metallic taste. Try citrus juices, lemonade, cranberry juices and pickles. Do not try this if you have a sore mouth or throat

    Try seasoning meats with different spices, herbs and sauces available at your local grocery store

    Choose foods that do not leave a strong aftertaste

    If you find some drinks are too strong or too sweet, try adding water

    Keep trying a variety of foods and you may find a new favorite

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